Archives For So That the World May Believe

“Two years after undercover videos rocked Planned Parenthood, the organization has emerged stronger than ever financially–thanks to a massive influx of private donors and support that is helping the organization evolve and restructure.” National Catholic Register.

It seems unbelievable that the truth about Planned Parenthood affiliates selling the body parts of unborn children could bring this result.

Not surprising is what PP is doing with the money: using it to keep more money coming in.

PP has allocated $96 million “to strengthening its grass-roots activists and lobbying apparatus” in order to “strengthen and secure Planned Parenthood.”

This news comes in the light of greatly reduced client numbers–down from three million to 2.4 million. PP is experiencing a 13 percent decrease in total services, a 14 percent decrease in abortion facilities, and most remarkably, a 60 percent decrease in prenatal care.

It seems some expectant mothers have seen the Daleiden videos. Or read the online reviews. Continue Reading…

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Know that the Lord is God,
he made us, we belong to him,
we are his people, the flock he shepherds.

~Psalm 100;3 NABRE~

I remember watching a segment CBS journalist Harry Reasoner did–probably for 60 Minutes–in the early or mid-1970s. It was about our changing perspective of sex. The most powerful words Reasoner said came at the end of his piece. They went something like this:

~It may be that the head cheerleader would give in and have sex with the quarterback. But she knew she was giving away something important. And he knew he was getting something very valuable.~ Continue Reading…

I’ve taught the book before.

I taught it before Edward Snowden. Before smartphones. And before biometrics–the technology that can identify you digitally just from your face.

In essence, I taught it before it came so close to reality.

It was in 1948 that George Orwell was imagining the world of Big Brother–the government entity who was always watching, all-knowing, and ever vicious. Technology then was a radio plugged into the wall, a telephone hanging on the wall, and newsreels and romance at the cinema.

Orwell wasn’t real; he was surreal.

Nineteen-eighty-four came. Apple made an ad buy during the Super Bowl that year to introduce Mac computers. The commercial assured us that the year 1984 was nothing like the book 1984. That year, the term “cyberspace” was coined.

We’d come a long way, Baby.

Thirty-four years later, we are not yet zombie drones in colorless clothing watching and worshiping Big Brother on a giant screen.

After all, our clothing is never colorless. And Big Brother is bigger than the government and more stealthy than Orwell’s symbol of oppression.

Google tracks our online purchases. Social media tracks our likes, our friends, our interests, and our issues. And we have yet to comprehend all the government knows about us. A multitude of Big Brothers is watching.

We are less uncomfortable about it than we dreamed we could be three-plus decades ago. And that is our folly.


Image Credit: Pixabay

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He came to power too late, he thought. Too late for himself, past his prime. And too late for his country, as the Nazi war machine inched closer to British shores.

Darkest Hour explores the ascension of Winston Churchill to power and his entrenchment as Great Britain’s commander in chief during World War II. Anyone remotely familiar with Churchill’s quips and quotes will recognize much from the film. The Prime Minister did not need a screenwriter to be profound.

His profoundness flowed from a wisdom that would not have been fully ripe had his ascension happened sooner.

He placed his rivals around him–on his war council. The better to keep an eye on them. Yet, the better for them to wear him down. And they nearly did.

Neville Chamberlain–who had negotiated with Hitler and claimed to have achieved “peace in our time”–did not learn from the Nazi military advance and Hitler’s deceit. He urged Churchill toward further negotiation, assuming the fall of England was unavoidable. Continue Reading…

Food, in the end, in our own tradition, is something holy. It’s not about nutrients and calories. It’s about sharing. It’s about honesty. It’s about identity.” Louise Fresco

He wants to learn how to cook–perhaps professionally. A grandson coming of age. His father likes to cook. And the son has been asking me how I do this or that. And can he help?

“Cream puffs,” I said, “Let me show you how to make cream puffs.”

I make them by special request–and yearly for his aunt’s birthday.

Our cream puffs are not pictured above. Ours were a tad less poufy but good–at least once we got to the second tray.

Boiling the water and butter (only real butter), then adding the flour. The batter looked like mashed potatoes until we added the eggs.

 

It’s a version of Murphy’s Law that, when you’re trying to show off a particular skill, something won’t go right. Little cream puffs put low in the oven get too crispy. The next tray went higher, bigger, better.

Life lesson: Failure is an opportunity to adjust and go again.

I heated the milk for the pudding/filling in the microwave. I confess that I used a pudding mix rather than working from scratch. Perhaps on another day that isn’t as full, we can make scratch pudding. A mix, yes. Instant? No way!

Kitchen rule: It’s a sin to make your own cream puffs and fill them with instant pudding.

Life lesson: Pursue quality. But quality in the experience is more important than the quality of scratch every time.

The day was a typical Wednesday. Lots of noise with four boys–three brothers and a cousin–coming to my house in a borrowed van after school. A convenient meal tossed in the oven. An evening of youth group and children’s church activities.

But this Wednesday was special because we had cream puffs. Even if all of them weren’t perfect. Even if we were just a bit rushed.

He and I made them together. We didn’t just make food. We made a memory.

We made something that lasts longer than a meal. We shared flavor and sustenance passed from one generation to another.


Photo Credit: Pixabay

Permissions: You are permitted and encouraged to reproduce and distribute this material in any format provided that you do not alter the wording in any way, do not charge a fee beyond the cost of reproduction, and you credit the author.

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the entities I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

Our Education Problem

January 8, 2018 — 4 Comments

“The problem in education is not a lack of money–we’re spending more than ever before. The problem is not a matter of access to the “right curriculum.” The problem is we have abandoned the priorities of character and moral development along with teaching reasoning and objective truth. We have failed to give children a foundation they can use to learn on their own.” Dr. Everett Piper, Not a Day Care: The Devastating Consequences of Abandoning Truth ~

I remember my daughter coming home from a day in high school quite a few years ago. She had asked a question in class. Apparently, the teacher didn’t know the answer and didn’t care to search it out. Her response? “You don’t need to know that.”

The teacher moved on–perhaps embarrassed at her own ignorance–perhaps not. According to her, my daughter didn’t need to know the answer in order to…?

It was a foreign language class. Theoretically, my daughter has had no need at all of that subject since she has not visited that land nor engaged a non-English speaker from there. She just wanted to know how to say a particular word.

And the teacher shut her down, dumping water on a spark of curiosity. Continue Reading…

Manhunt: Unabomber on Netflix is an excellent series about the search for Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber. Tightly woven storytelling, great performances, and an accurate, balanced rendering of Kaczynski’s story bring us to his purpose–even his prophecy–that technology binds us more than it frees us.

But his violence muted his message.

Kaczynski had been a math prodigy. He had not been a popular child in school. But because of his high intelligence (an IQ higher than that of Stephen Hawking), he moved up two grades. He suffered torment, partly because of his awkwardness, partly because children can be so cruel. Continue Reading…

Give Anyway

January 2, 2018 — 5 Comments

“At its best, giving is an act of worship.” — Cornelius J. Dyck

I was a single mother struggling to get by when he was looking for a tax deduction. I still don’t know his name.

It was almost the end of the year, late enough that Christmas spending was not a consideration. The amount was sizable enough for me to ask my pastor–the go-between in this anonymous transaction–whether I should fix my roof or invest in a better car. Continue Reading…

Happy New Year!

January 1, 2018 — Leave a comment

In 2017, we had snow for Christmas and a bit more for the New Year. Perfect for our exchange student who hails from a tropical region.

This weather is a new experience for him. Shoveling, cleaning off the car, and cross-country skiing.

Challenges and adventures in the here and now. Challenges and adventures await in the months ahead. Snow falls, time passes, new leaves and new life unfold.

A path before us to walk with the God with us–Emmanuel.

Praying His best for you and yours this year.


Photo Credit: Pixabay

Permissions: You are permitted and encouraged to reproduce and distribute this material in any format provided that you do not alter the wording in any way, do not charge a fee beyond the cost of reproduction, and you credit the author.

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the entities I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!” Isaiah 5:20–

The situation had to do with a man who had a position of authority in our town. He was married and had multiple children.  My job was to follow the workings of our town–requiring our paths to cross.

I guess he pegged me as divorced, struggling, and lonely. Divorced and struggling, yes. Lonely? Not that lonely.

His inappropriateness was subtle yet clear. He liked me. “Did you dress up for me today?” he asked once. Continue Reading…