What Makes a Worthy Life and Who Gets to Decide?

Alfie Evans is a 23-month-old child who has the misfortune of living in the United Kingdom where the government “provides” health care for its citizens.
But only for the citizens it deems worthy of life. And it does not deem Alfie Evans worthy of life.
He’s in a “semi-vegetative state,” they say. A vegetative state means a patient shows ” no evidence of awareness of self or environment and cannot interact with other people.” Therefore, a “semi-vegetative state” would indicate the child is sometimes aware or sometimes can interact.
Alfie suffers from “a degenerative neurological condition that has never been definitively diagnosed by medical specialists.” Continue reading “What Makes a Worthy Life and Who Gets to Decide?”

Power Struggles of Faith and Folly

Early in America’s argument over Roe v. Wade, a group of pro-life supporters sat down with abortion supporters to see if they could find some common ground.
A day or two earlier, pro-life feminists had examined the contents of a dumpster behind an abortion clinic and retrieved a dead child–the victim of a late term abortion–a little girl.
During the meeting as both sides chatted amiably, a woman stepped forward cradling the infant’s body. She explained that the child she held in her hands had died by abortion. She gave everyone in the room clarity about the issue. There could be no middle ground. Continue reading “Power Struggles of Faith and Folly”

When Trisomy (and otherwise challenged) Babies Don't Die

“Statistically, there is no hope here.”
That’s what one doctor told former Senator Rick Santorum and his wife Karen when their daughter Bella was born.
More than nine years ago.
The doctor referred to Bella as “baby”–because somehow we are more human when we have a name. And he could not bring himself to attribute humanity to her. Continue reading “When Trisomy (and otherwise challenged) Babies Don't Die”

The Slippery Slope Is Real

It was called the slippery slope. A pro-life argument that legalizing and normalizing abortion would lead to further disregard for human life. It was part of the discussion in the early years of the pro-life cause.
Abortion would lead to infanticide and then, first passive, then active, euthanasia.
In 1982, the case of Baby Doe continued the slide. Baby Doe had been born with Down Syndrome and a need for surgery to connect his esophagus to his stomach. It’s a fairly common defect. And usually, there is no question about doing the surgery. Continue reading “The Slippery Slope Is Real”