Archives For Rod Dreher

“Prayer is not asking. Prayer is putting oneself in the hands of God, at His disposition, and listening to His voice in the depth of our hearts.” Mother Teresa

Some Christian traditions–or just individual Christians–emphasize prayer and contemplation along with Christian action. Others emphasize action along with prayer and contemplation.

In no tradition–and I would hope, with no individual Christian–is either mode of expressing our faith exclusive. It’s a matter of emphasis.

I was struck by this point while reading Rod Dreher’s The Benedict Option. In the chapter about the monks of Norcia, Dreher talks about how their days are structured around prayer, then work. Continue Reading…

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“While there are many secondary issues genuine believers will continue to debate this side of eternity, I have and will always champion what C.S. Lewis called mere Christianity. ‘In essentials unity, non-essentials liberty, and in all things charity.'”  Hank Hanegraaff

Hank Hanegraaff recently joined the Greek Orthodox Church. His change of congregation has caused a great gasp in some corners of evangelical Christianity. A voice of evangelicalism through a syndicated apologetics radio program, Hanegraaff and his wife on Palm Sunday were accepted into the Greek Orthodox Church.

He’s walked away from Christianity! He’s gone from grace to works! That’s the view many have of anyone who moves from evangelicalism to a liturgical tradition–especially to Catholicism or Orthodoxy.

But lately, many have changed pews, some, like Hanegraaf, moving from evangelical to liturgical and others from liturgical traditions to under the steeples of evangelicalism.

My two favorite authors illustrate this point. Eric Metaxas came to evangelical Christianity from Greek Orthodoxy. And Rod Dreher came to Eastern Orthodoxy from Methodism.

Now Hank Hanegraaff, the Bible Answer Man, has followed Dreher’s route–to Orthodoxy. And some are horrified. Continue Reading…

“[T]he Benedict Option is a call to undertaking the long and patient work of reclaiming the real world from the artifice, alienation, and atomization of modern life. It is a way of seeing the world and of living in the world that undermines modernity’s big lie: that humans are nothing more than ghosts in a machine, and we are free to adjust the settings in any way we like.” Rod Dreher, The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation (236).

If you’re a Christian, don’t read this book unless you are truly willing to face the deep realities that Rod Dreher presents within its pages.

But if you are a Christian, you really should read this book.

It will move you to change your life.

And you will find it is not the same book some critics have described.

The Benedict Option is not a call for the faithful to cloister ourselves in a monastery or don white robes and sit on a mountaintop awaiting the Apocalypse.

Dreher calls us to a more focused faith walk, to “be the church, without compromise, no matter what it costs” (3, emphasis Dreher’s).

He calls us to a deeper prayer life. A life steeped in community with other faithful Christians. A life that looks very different from the lives many of us lead–pursuit of consumerism and busy-ness with splashes of church sprinkled between. Continue Reading…

In a nutshell, when we concentrate on teaching the deep truths of our faith rather than superficialities, that effort will, for example, lead us back to the early saints who risked their own lives caring for plague victims.

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“The Christian life, properly understood, cannot be merely a set of propositions agreed to, but must also be a way of life. And that requires a culture, which is to say, the realization in a material way–in deeds, in language, in song, in drama, in practices, etc.–of the propositions taught by Christianity. To be perfectly clear, at the core of all this is a living spiritual relationship with God, one that cannot be reduced to words, deeds, or beliefs,” Rod Dreher (emphasis his).

With little fanfare from the mainstream media, the Washington Supreme Court last week unanimously sided against Barronelle Stutzman, a 71-year-old florist who refused to provide flower arrangements for a same-sex wedding.

Stutzman has been battling the legal challenge, which threatens to relieve her of her life’s work and earnings.

She is appealing to the US Supreme Court. A ruling favorable to religious freedom seems unlikely since the court has already refused to hear an appeal from a New Mexico photographer, also sued for refusing service for a same-sex wedding. These cases are a harbinger of things to come.  Continue Reading…

We are called to be the voice of peace and reason. To bring our peace to the chaos. To bring Him to the lost and shouting.

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“The so-called right to abortion has pitted mothers against their children and women against men. It has sown violence and discord at the heart of the most intimate human relationships.” ― Mother Teresa.

Forty-four years after Roe v. Wade and  America finds that the issue will just not go away. There was an expectation that a generation or two growing up with this “right” would not be able to find its way back. The issue would dissolve into acceptance. The procedures would be legal, safe, and rare.

Many did not walk down that road of thought.

But rare it is becoming. We have looked through the window of the womb and many of us have found ourselves.

The shift in thinking today seems to spring from a scientific view–not a religious one. An accusation in the early days of the argument was that those who opposed abortion sought to impose a religious view on the non-religious. Continue Reading…

“Good pitching will always stop good hitting–and vice versa.” Casey Stengel.

The 2016 World Series is a pitchers’ duel, except when it’s not. The Cubs have Theo Epstein, who orchestrated the Red Sox win in ’04. But the Indians have the former Sox manager Terry Francona. Only one team will find the magic mix of pixie dust.

Hillary Clinton’s mix of magic dust now has more dust than glitter.

Media accounts were calling it an October Surprise. But the surprise didn’t come from the Trump camp. It came from the FBI.

Before the FBI announced the reopening of the Clinton email investigation, Peggy Noonan opined that Trump’s purpose in history  would end short of winning the White House. Continue Reading…

A few weeks ago, I pointed out that the Cubs could win the World Series for the first time in 108 years and that the presidential election had gotten crazy.

The Cubs are still in the chase. And the election is even crazier.

In Utah, a gentleman (You get to use that term so seldom today) named Evan McMullin is polling at 22 percent with both Clinton and Trump tied at 26. I didn’t know he existed two days ago–even after a pollster called to ask who I would vote for. Yesterday, I found out that, in that one state, he is at least close to the margin of error. Continue Reading…

Here are some updates on recent blog topics.

CBN.com “Sale of Baby Body Parts Hearing–Our Humanity Should Be Repulsed.”

A House committee is investigating whether abortion clinics are illegally selling body parts of unborn children for profit.

“For crying out loud, this is the Amazon.com of baby body parts,” Rep. Joe Pitts, R-PA, commented. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-CA, charged that the hearings were designed to “restrict women’s healthcare.”

Killing babies isn’t healthcare. Making this allegation is a red herring–designed to get us to look away from the topic at hand–the babies. Continue Reading…